It's even lonelier on the way down


The company I worked for at the time was located in a suburb of Atlanta.


The parent company was out of Sacramento. They sent in a new executive from the Philly area.


He was arrogant and made no effort to get to know the people. He was the BOSS and expected everyone to know it.


He wasn't very successful as he couldn't gain buy-in or loyalty from the team. He eventually was replaced with someone local.


About 10 years later, as President of a company, I received a copy of his resume along with a job application.


My initial reaction was to put him through the ringer and give him a hard time for the way he treated people.


When I looked at his resume, I could tell his career had not been kind to him.


I reached out and let him know it wouldn't be a good fit but that I'd do what I could to help him.


Not sure he remembered me but it didn't really matter. I focused on doing the right thing regardless of what happened to me.


As I work with clients today as a Business Coach, I often pass along that story.


Treating people with respect is a core tenet of being a good leader.


Sure, it gets lonely at the top, but it's much lonelier on the way back down.


Rich Hall

Rich Hall Group

www.richhallgroup.com

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